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12 ژانویه 2021

problems facing the military today

10 ژانویه 2021

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10 ژانویه 2021

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problems facing the military today

Will we ever have everything we need in our kit? And while we were up there, what they call storms would be Category 1, Category 2 hurricanes here in the Continental United States. Yeah. That causes us to deploy. I am Dris Tanakes (ph) from a consulting firm here in town and also a lieutenant, ex, from the U.S. Navy. General Neller from the Marine Corps, 37th commandant, has—, NELLER: I said MIT degree here. And so this is an area where the fight is on. You know, about 30 percent of the world’s trade flows through that part of the ocean. And we’re going to go do 980(,000) by fiscal year ’18. They are much more than that now. They approved that. Whereas China, Russia are more our traditional kinds of threats. I mean, that’s just sort of at the macro scale—you know, your father went up—his job off of Okinawa was the fighter director who was the person who vectored fighters in to go against the kamikaze threat, which was the only thing in World War II that Admiral Nimitz said he did not anticipate by virtue of his participation in the war games in Newport, right, that resulted in War Plan Orange. We’ve had pretty good success at that here of late without going after my dear friend John Richardson’s Navy budget. And they don’t extend beyond that. Thank all of you for coming and doing this again. We’re working with the Iraqi Security Forces and the various Kurdish forces to do that. At the same time, General Milley, you’re probably going to be moving from a force that right now is about, what, 470,000 active? Providing readers with the essential background and building blocks necessary to make sense of this complicated and interconnected world. SANGER: —a North Korea that could actually put a nuclear weapon on a short-range missile. General Mark A. Welsh III, chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force; General Mark A. Milley, chief of staff of the U.S. Army; Admiral John M. Richardson chief of staff of the U.S. Navy; General Robert B. Neller, chief of staff of the U.S. Marine Corps; and Admiral Paul F. Zukunft, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, join the New York Times' David E. Sanger to discuss challenges facing the U.S. military. SANGER: Just one or two last things and then we’re going to open it up to all of you. They’re doing incredible work day in and day out counseling soldiers in the midst of a fight but also after the fight when the trauma is sometimes very, very serious. SANGER: And now we believe that even if they can’t deliver them here, they probably do have a short-range nuclear capability. We were—we keep repeating it’s not drone, it’s not an unmanned aircraft, it’s a remotely piloted aircraft, which we’re even getting tired of saying and everybody’s really tired of hearing it. And that’s quite a bit different than what I saw in the fall. The propensity (willingness) to serve is approximately 15 percent, leaving 1,020,000 able but unwilling to serve, and 180,000 able and willing to serve. That’s still there. That’s for sure. SANGER: Admiral Zukunft, there’s been a lot of discussion that is actually in some ways a better role for the Coast Guard, yours and others around the world. Just 29 percent of America's 18 year olds can meet minimum enlistment requirements. They’ve been active in there. And that campaign plan, like any war plan, has to be adjusted based on the facts on the ground. (Laughter.) December 22, 2020, To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that My personal observation is I don’t see that. Over the past 18 years of “endless war,” the Pentagon has adopted numerous measures to prop up the AVF. That will always be there. So that’s why, in the Navy, we’re running those numbers again. And so we—you know, we design those very carefully. And then we have the compendium for it. I’d missed several recent issues of the Marine Corps … So tell us a little bit about how you view numbers versus the technological capability. And if that’s where they’re going, then I think that changes kind of the calculus in this whole thing. MILLEY: That’s what we’re trying to achieve. So the military is not—and we’re part of the national elements of power. And these are very different kinds of missions, because counterterrorism requires you to be focused in on small forces, very precision in applying a large amount of force in a small amount of area where you can, big intelligence issues. Military members endure a lifestyle unlike any other, and, in kind, can be affected by a unique set of health and wellness issues. Has been the commander of naval submarine forces. MILLEY: We do that in the tank all the time as well. With respect to the tradeoff between, you know, numbers versus capability, it is—it’s a false choice, I think, a little bit when you think about, you know, we need to provide maritime security and credible options to our decision makers. It’s come through in all of this discussion about how you’re trying to put together coalitions, how it is that you’re attempting to build force multipliers. SANGER: You’re going to go down to at least 450(,000). They’re in Anbar. And it’s not just the military. So under certain contexts, yes, we do have those authorities, at least for Title 10. And so you’ve got to have sufficient capacity so that you’ve got options out there if something should happen. And I think each of our services, our national leadership has asked us to do certain things with capabilities and we’re doing that. Even if you ran the numbers, did the threat analysis five years ago or so, you know, we probably wouldn’t have included Russia in that calculus. SANGER: So can you tell us a little bit about it and where we sign up for it? To combat the growing military-civilian divide, the military must be willing to change its recruiting tactics amid changing times, the author of this opinion piece writes. So what we’ve done—and this is more of a special operations thing. by Richard N. Haass You responded to David’s question about saying, against ISIS, that you were going to have an indigenous force. I think that’s the way to go to keep the world a stable and safe place. MILLEY: The Marines can deal with it. But figures from the military itself show that Moscow faces an even more serious task, given demographic problems and the army’s inability to get contract soldiers to sign … And thanks to the ambassador and to Mrs. McKeon for the opportunity for us to be here. It’s interesting with some countries is that when you do things in response to their actions and they then accuse you of doing something to aggravate them, which causes them to do something. I have no idea who—what strategies they’ll be in the future, but we think that we can execute what’s asked of us today. SANGER: —than we’ve ever seen before as well. Field Marshal Sanger, as you know—(laughter)—is the national security correspondent for The New York Times, where he’s been for some three decades now. ), So, yeah, we do need to modernize, but the good news is when you say, what do you need, you need to be able to modernize but you need to maintain your force structure at the same time. And because of the fights in Iraq and Afghanistan, we took a lot of the force structure we had there that we would deploy from the States to Okinawa or Japan and we sent it to the Middle East. It’s always one of the most interesting and invigorating evenings at the Council, and it reminds you that you really have multiple jobs here. (Laughter.). It kind of seemed to me sliding over the part about the split between the Sunnis and the Shia that were going to be in this force. Yeah, we just don’t know. Admiral John Richardson, our newest arrival here. And so—and, you know, it’s not just us. I think that would be counterproductive. What I think we’ve done, and we continue to do, is we work with nations who have come to ask us to help them train their force to be able to be able to counteract this. They were part of the Warsaw Pact. NELLER: By being forward deployed. Where we should use remotely piloted aircraft in the future, or even autonomous unmanned aircraft in the future, is in those areas where they provide benefit over having a manned platform. NELLER: Well, I think the first thing we have to do is be able to protect ourselves and protect our citizens and protect our allies. You know, when you think about the five big areas—, MILLEY: General Neller, is that what you—. I’m just curious. There’s just lots of ways to use this technology to do the things we’ve always done in a better, more comprehensive way. So how did they get that way? But at the same time, I think we have to make it very clear that, one, we’re going to defend ourselves and we’re going to defend the homeland and we’re going to defend our allies. These are Inuit tribesmen who have lived up there for more than the last millennium and they say: The ocean around us has changed. Sign up for the Early Bird Brief - a daily roundup of military and defense news stories from around the globe. I want to start off by asking you on the counterterrorism side: How do you assess, General Milley, the speed with which we reacted to the rise of ISIS two years ago? Let’s develop a fully developed air campaign to get at all of those and then, you know, extend it ever beyond that so that we’re looking at every tool that we’ve got to really, you know, as the president wants us to do, is to crush this enemy. We have 42 counter-drug agreements that allow us to use deadly force right up to the shoreline of another country. You still have some sequester issues going on. We can use them to actually target. What is the biggest problem facing the U.S. military today? So I’m hoping to speak not only about what’s going on today, but where they see the military headed. And so, you know, advocating for the ruleset that enables that trade to proceed on a very open and level playing field, allowing all players to, you know, prosper and compete, if you will, without conflict—you know, continuing to advocate for that ruleset so that as, you know, the president and everybody else say, we can operate and fly and sail wherever international law allows. ZUKUNFT: Well, first and foremost, I have an open and frank dialogue with my counterpart in China. Perhaps Winston Churchill was right when he said that “Americans will always do the right thing, after exhausting every other alternative.”. And they—as a result of that, the initial strategy that Mark referred to let them have a vote and kind of direct activity for probably the first six, eight months, in my view. WELSH: We’re all facing a problem, David, with this quantity-versus-quality issue—. Podcast SANGER: When I walk through your building, on those days that they let me in, I hear people say, you know, we’re not going to accomplish the task of actually destroying them until we have a Sunni force on the ground that can take them on on the ground in a way that President Obama has clearly been unwilling to allow American forces to go do, given the experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan. You look like an alien. Tell us a little bit about what your concerns are there. Jun Ayota (ph), Princeton University. So we’re going to have to be—we’ve thought about this a lot but it all involves permissions and authorities. So, today, 330 million Americans lay claim to rights, liberties, and privileges that not one of them is obligated to protect and defend. The American people must address their problem. And there’s partners all over the world watching this. And, to me, the most impressive statistic at all, half of whom have gone on to the rank of general or admiral. What are we doing about missile defense—not just to you but any of you, what are we doing about missile defense, and particularly looking forward to a world where there will be several nuclear weapons-capable states, bad guy states? The issues are less military than political. But it’s also—I think it would be a mistake to characterize the Iraqi government or the Iraqi security forces as a surrogate of Iran. So the secretary of defense has talked about the five big areas of effort for the military these days: China, Russia, Iran, North Korea, and, of course, the counterterrorism mission. It’s kept the peace in Europe since the end of World War II. SANGER: Would that do the trick if the South Koreans agreed to take it? They’re being hugely successful in Anbar right now. And that’s been the change of the last six to eight months. And if you can launch a swarm of those, you might argue you have access denial. 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Call themselves the five big areas—, milley: well, I have a question I agree with Mark the... Says, describing one of the national elements of power are very clever, and we ’ ve multiple. Eastern Ukraine where they ’ re facing in the Army ; it is the redeployment of some NATO forces are...

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